Tue. Jun 18th, 2024

Legionnaires’ disease in two people who stayed at NH resort hotel

New Hampshire health officials said Friday that two cases of Legionnaires’ disease have been identified in people who stayed at the Mountain View Grand Resort in Whitefield, and one person has died.The Department of Health and Human Services said the two older adults from out-of-state had been staying at the resort, but an investigation is still underway to determine exactly how and where they contracted the illness.Dr. Benjamin Chan, the state epidemiologist, said that one person was from Rhode Island and the other was from Massachusetts. The Massachusetts resident has died, while the Rhode Island resident was hospitalized, Chan said.The two people are not connected and stayed at the hotel at different times, Chan said. He said one patient became ill with pneumonia in October, and the other was diagnosed this month.>> Download the free WMUR app to get updates on the go: Apple | Google Play <<Chan said the hotel’s hot tub has been shut down, and investigators are testing the water system.”Some of the common culprits that oftentimes can become contaminated and then spread contaminated water droplets in the air include things like hot tubs and water fountains, Chan said. “In the course of our investigation, those are the types of sources that we look for that could be causing contaminated water to be spread, and people then inhale the droplets of water and can develop an infection.”The disease is caused by Legionella bacteria, which can contaminate water systems. Health officials said people can get sick by inhaling water droplets from showers, hot tubs or faucets.Symptoms of Legionnaires’ disease include fever, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, headaches and pneumonia. The symptoms typically develop two to 14 days after exposure.Older people, immunocompromised people, and smokers are generally at higher risk. The most severe form of infection is pneumonia. Chan said that guests should be on the lookout for symptoms, particularly if they’re having more severe symptoms of a pneumonia, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath.

New Hampshire health officials said Friday that two cases of Legionnaires’ disease have been identified in people who stayed at the Mountain View Grand Resort in Whitefield, and one person has died.

The Department of Health and Human Services said the two older adults from out-of-state had been staying at the resort, but an investigation is still underway to determine exactly how and where they contracted the illness.

Dr. Benjamin Chan, the state epidemiologist, said that one person was from Rhode Island and the other was from Massachusetts. The Massachusetts resident has died, while the Rhode Island resident was hospitalized, Chan said.

The two people are not connected and stayed at the hotel at different times, Chan said. He said one patient became ill with pneumonia in October, and the other was diagnosed this month.

>> Download the free WMUR app to get updates on the go: Apple | Google Play <<

Chan said the hotel’s hot tub has been shut down, and investigators are testing the water system.

“Some of the common culprits that oftentimes can become contaminated and then spread contaminated water droplets in the air include things like hot tubs and water fountains,
Chan said. “In the course of our investigation, those are the types of sources that we look for that could be causing contaminated water to be spread, and people then inhale the droplets of water and can develop an infection.”

The disease is caused by Legionella bacteria, which can contaminate water systems. Health officials said people can get sick by inhaling water droplets from showers, hot tubs or faucets.

Symptoms of Legionnaires’ disease include fever, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, headaches and pneumonia. The symptoms typically develop two to 14 days after exposure.

Older people, immunocompromised people, and smokers are generally at higher risk. The most severe form of infection is pneumonia. Chan said that guests should be on the lookout for symptoms, particularly if they’re having more severe symptoms of a pneumonia, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath.

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